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Check it out: Male or female? First sex-determining genes appeared in mammals some 180 million years ago

Source: National Eye Institute - Related MedlinePlus Pages: Brain Diseases, Eye Diseases, Obesity ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 24, 2014, 6:15 am (info)

From MedPage Today: Benzos Equal for Kids With Status Epilepticus. A randomized trial showed diazepam to be as safe and effective as lorazepam in treating children with status epilepticus (SE) #8212; a result likely to surprise many in the field. Hypoglycemia at Night Tied to Arrhythmias. Nocturnal hypoglycemia was a major risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias in type 2 diabetes patients who were already at an increased risk for cardiovascular events. Pradaxa, Xarelto, Eliquis: NOACs #8217; Rev ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 24, 2014, 6:15 am (info)

The process of metastasis - a tumor's ability to spread to other parts of the body - is still poorly understood. ... more

Scientists have shown new genetic evidence that could strengthen the link between the role of dietary fats with colon cancer progression. ... more

Cancer researchers have discovered a new 'dustman' role for a molecule that helps a drug kill cancer cells according to a study*, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of... ... more

Adrenal metastasis following gastrectomy for gastric cancer is often encountered as part of advanced systemic dissemination, which is usually unresectable. Thus, there are very few published case reports describing metastasectomy for adrenal metastasis from gastric cancer. Herein we present our experience in treating two patients diagnosed and treated for adrenal metastasis 6 years following initial surgery for advanced gastric cancer (pT2bN1M0 and pT2bN0M0, respectively, according to the classi ... more

Purpose: To present the clinical, imaging, pathological and immunohistochemical features of giant cell angiofibroma (GCA).Case presentationIn this paper we report an atypical case of a GCA extending from the parotid to the parapharyngeal space. The lesion was being treated as a vascular malformation for one year prior to surgical removal. We summarize the clinical manifestations, imaging, pathological and molecular features of this rare disease.After complete surgical removal of the tumor, immun ... more

Background: Presently, CD133 is one of the hottest markers to characterize cancer stem cells and KAI1/CD82 is reported as an important marker for the metastasis and prognosis of many cancers. The purpose of our study is to explore the relationship between cancer stem cells (CSCs) marked by CD133 and KAI1/CD82 expression and the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect the expression of ... more

Background: Parotid gland metastasis in lung cancer is extremely rare, very few cases have been reported.Case presentationWe report on the case of a 61-year-old Chinese male patient who presented with parotid swelling metastasizing from advanced lung cancer. We therefore performed an operation of partial parotidectomy with preservation of the facial nerve and advised the patient receive chemotherapy, however, the patient died four months later. Conclusion: Although it is extremely rare, a potent ... more

Few crimes committed by mentally ill patients were directly linked to symptoms, researcher notes ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Those with memory loss fared better than those who showed deficits in thinking abilities ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

But some believe the study is flawed ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Almost one-third of adults in Canada have experienced child abuse -- physical abuse, sexual abuse or exposure to intimate partner (parents, step-parents or guardians) violence in their home. As well, child abuse is linked to mental disorders and suicidal ideation (thoughts) or suicide attempts, research shows. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

In the new health-care climate of the Affordable Care Act and efforts to expand Medicare to accommodate more individuals and children, the need to closely examine ways to best use government funding is becoming increasingly evident. A new study examines racial and ethnic differences in Medicaid expenditures for children in the welfare system who use psychotropic drugs. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Recommendations for a molecular diagnostics curriculum at both the baccalaureate and master's levels of education have been published. The challenge, as stated in the report, is to balance the requirements of accreditation, certification, and the needs of the job market. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression are being made by researchers. A team of physician-scientists has identified a major mechanism by which ghrelin (a hormone with natural anti-depressant properties) works inside the brain. Simultaneously, the researchers identified a potentially powerful new treatment for depression in the form of a neuroprotective drug known as P7C3. The study is notable because although a number of anti-depressant drugs and other treatments are a ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Approximately 15 percent of all lung cancers are small cell lung cancers, which grow rapidly and often develop resistance to chemotherapy. However, researchers have revealed new insights into the mechanisms leading to this resistance that may lead to improved therapies. They discovered that the expression of a protein called Noxa is critical to the effectiveness of ABT-737 because it helps regulate the function of MCL-1, another pro-survival Bcl-2 family protein. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

An inexpensive glaucoma drug, when added to a weight loss plan, can improve vision for women with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), according to a study. This disorder mostly affects young, overweight women. Vision loss and headaches are common symptoms. An estimated 100,000 Americans have it, and the number is rising with the obesity epidemic. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

A study demonstrated that hospitals participating in a national quality-improvement program have markedly increased the speed with which they treat stroke patients with the clot-busting drug. This speedier treatment was accompanied by reduced mortality, fewer treatment complications and a greater likelihood that patients would go home after leaving the hospital instead of being referred to a skilled nursing facility. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

A recently FDA-approved device has been shown to reduce seizures in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy by as much as 50 percent. When coupled with an innovative electrode placement planning system, the device facilitated the complete elimination of seizures in nearly half of the implanted patients enrolled in the decade-long clinical trials. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Perhaps due to lack of or inconsistent insurance coverage, young adults age 18 to 25 tend to go to the doctor €™s office less often than children or adolescents, yet have higher rates of emergency room use, finds a study. These findings are from a study of data from the 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, collected in advance of the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which allows young adults to stay on family insurance plans until age 26 and makes it easier for them to obtain t ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Speed-reading is a technique used to read quickly. It involves visual searching for clues to meaning and skipping non-essential words and/or sentences. Similarly in humans, biological systems are sometimes under selective pressure to quickly "read" genetic information. Genes that need to be read quickly are usually small, as the smaller the encoding message, the easier it will be to read them quickly. Now, researchers have discovered that, besides size, the gene architecture is also important to ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Burning coal for domestic heating may contribute to early fetal death according to a new study that took place in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia -- the coldest capital city in the world. Researchers report "alarmingly strong statistical correlations" between seasonal ambient air pollutants and pregnancy loss. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Researchers have for the first time used electrical pulses delivered from a cochlear implant to deliver gene therapy, thereby successfully regrowing auditory nerves. The research also heralds a possible new way of treating a range of neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease, and psychiatric conditions such as depression through this novel way of delivering gene therapy. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

'Mutant' protein clusters, long blamed for the progression of Huntington's and other neurodegenerative diseases, have been the primary focus of therapies in development by pharmaceutical companies. But according to new research, these drugs may not only be ineffective -- they may pose a serious threat to patients. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

The Y chromosome, which distinguishes males from females at the genetic level, appeared some 180 million years ago. It originated twice independently in all mammals. Scientists have managed to date these events that are crucial for both mammalian evolution and our lives, because the Y chromosome determines whether we are born as a boy or girl. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

A researcher is looking to give exercise enthusiasts the extra nudge they need during a workout, and her latest research shows that a cyber buddy can help. The study is the first to indicate that although a human partner is still a better motivator during exercise, a software-generated partner also can be effective. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

The greater prevalence of asthma, allergies and other chronic inflammatory disorders among people of lower socioeconomic status might be due in part to their reduced exposure to the microbes that thrive in rural environments, according to a new scientific paper. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Thirty to 40 percent of US households live hand-to-mouth, but new research has found that most of those people aren't poor. Stimulus programs -- such as those in 2001, 2008 and 2009 -- are designed to boost the economy quickly by getting cash into the hands of people likely to turn around and spend it. But sending cash to just the very poor may not be the right approach, according to researchers. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

A new way to detect when drivers are about to nod off behind the wheel has been developed. "Video-based systems that use cameras to detect when a car is drifting out of its lane are cumbersome and expensive. They don't work well on snow-covered or curvy roads, in darkness or when lane markers are faded or missing. Our invention provides an inexpensive and user-friendly technology that overcomes these limitations and can help catch fatigue earlier, well before accidents are likely to happen," sai ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 24, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

In case you wondered why your IT department isn #8217;t reasonable about security, it #8217;s because the penalties aren #8217;t reasonable. Stolen laptops lead to important HIPAA settlements Two entities have paid the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR) $1,975,220 collectively to resolve potential violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Rules.  These major enforcement actions underscore the signif ... more
Source: GruntDoc Apr 24, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

Background: Pulmonary metastases of thymomas are relatively rare. We report on two patients who underwent surgery for resection of pulmonary metastases.Methods and results: One patient was a 74-year-old man. A chest CT scan showed a mediastinal mass and a hilar nodule in the left lung. The patient underwent surgical resection of both of these lesions. The histological diagnosis was type A thymoma with intrapulmonary metastasis, classified as stage IVb. He did not receive any adjuvant therapy fol ... more

Less than a glass a day may also help the heart in those who already have kidney disease, researchers found ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 23, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Paper Money Carries Thousands of Types of Bacteria: Study ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 23, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Treatments and support for metastatic breast cancer can help women live longer and better than ever before. Here's how to take charge of your diagnosis and live better with metastatic breast cancer. ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 23, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Studies looked at improvements in ER, specially equipped ambulance that could deliver clot-busting drug ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 23, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Dr. Joel Elmquist has been awarded the American Diabetes Association €™s Outstanding Scientific Achievement Award, the organization €™s top honor for an early-career scientist. ... more
Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Introduction: Personal Freedom Checkups read more ... more

A team of neuroscientists has shown in rats that a drug commonly prescribed for hypertension can nearly eliminate the epilepsy that often follows severe head injury. The drug blocks a receptor on astrocytes, preventing a cascade of signals that lead to inflammation and neuron damage. The experiments also prove that epilepsy results from temporary breaks in the blood-brain barrier following head trauma. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Sweating is a natural function of the body to cool it down during physical exertion or from a warm environment or to even help cope with emotional situations. However, some people have overactive glands and produce sweat excessively, a medical condition called hyperhidrosis. A dermatologist offers tips to deal with the condition. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Approximately 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the United States, and most of those cases are entirely preventable, a researcher concluded. The main causes of diarrheal infections include norovirus outbreaks and foodborne pathogens, with most coming from contaminated leafy green vegetables, he states. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The rate of developing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) nearly doubles in those who both smoke and drink compared to those who only smoke or drink, according to new research. "Our study suggests that not only do alcohol and tobacco play an important role in the development of esophageal cancer, the combination of their use markedly increases their potency as carcinogens," said the lead author. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Scientists have shown how double stranded RNA is prevented from entering the nucleus of a cell. During the response against viral infection, the protein ADAR1 moves from the cell nucleus into the surrounding cytoplasm. There it modifies viral RNA to inhibit reproduction of the virus. But how is the human genome protected from inadvertent import of viral RNA into the nucleus? ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A ground-breaking report has been published recommending that medical insurers use prescription monitoring data to reduce the overdoses, deaths and health care costs associated with abuse of opioids and other prescription drugs. "This report documents the emerging consensus among leaders in the insurance and workers' compensation industry that knowing the full prescription history of an insured patient will help to provide safe and effective care and keep costs under control," said an expert. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A novel approach to curbing America's growing health care spending is to change the drugs, devices, and health information technology that get invented in the first place. Instead of examining existing medical technologies and their use, a new study suggests the study identifies options to affect what drugs and medical devices get created in the first place. The aim is to help reduce health care spending with as little loss of health as possible and to ensure that costlier advances have large en ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Nearly 7 in 10 Americans support mandated coverage of birth control medications, according to a new American national survey. Women, blacks, Hispanics, parents with children under the age of 18 at home, and adults with private or public insurance were significantly more likely than other adults to support universal coverage of birth control medications, according to the findings. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A review of the literature on treating multiple sclerosis aims to provide physicians with evidence-based information on the latest treatments for this chronic disease. The article looks at the latest pharmacologic research as well as disease-modifying agents and the benefits and risks of various treatments. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

As people around the world mark Earth Day (April 22) with activities that protect the planet, our cells are busy safeguarding their own environment. To keep themselves neat, tidy and above all healthy, cells rely on a variety of recycling and trash removal systems. If it weren't for these systems, cells could look like microscopic junkyards -- and worse, they might not function properly. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Over 15 mammalian clock proteins have been identified, but researchers surmise there are more. Could big data approaches help find them? To accelerate clock-gene discovery, investigators used a computer-assisted approach to identify and rank candidate clock components, which they liken to online Netflix-like profiling of movie suggestions for customers. This approach found a new core clock gene, which the team named CHRONO. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Health clinics that can provide primary care for low-income patients may ease the financial burden on both hospitals and insurance companies while improving patient health, researchers have concluded. A study of hospital admissions suggests that health clinics that avoid costs associated with insurance administration can help hospitals save money by lowering hospital admission rates and emergency room visits. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The risk of pregnancy among women using a newer method of planned sterilization called hysteroscopic sterilization is more than 10 times greater over a 10-year period than using the more commonly performed laparoscopic sterilization, a study has found. Hysteroscopic sterilization is a multi-step process that requires women to have a procedure to place coils inside the opening of the Fallopian tubes, use another method of contraception for three months after the procedure, and then have a special ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Two new studies may offer hope for people with migraines. Both studies involve drugs that are aimed at preventing migraine attacks from occurring, rather than stopping the attacks once they have started. These studies are the first to test monoclonal antibodies for the prevention of migraine, and both are directed against a relatively new target in migraine prevention, the calcitonin gene-related peptide, or CGRP. CGRP has been thought to be important in migraine, but never have drugs been devel ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

In a study that included more than 71,000 stroke patients, implementation of a quality initiative was associated with improvement in the time to treatment and a lower risk of in-hospital death, intracranial hemorrhage (bleeding in the brain), and an increase in the portion of patients discharged to their home. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Patients with arteriovenous malformations (abnormal connection between arteries and veins) in the brain that have not ruptured had a lower risk of stroke or death for up to 12 years if they received conservative management of the condition compared to an interventional treatment, according to a study. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The majority of adults surveyed in new research indicated they would want administration of clot-dissolving medications if incapacitated by a stroke, a finding that supports clinicians' use of this treatment if patient surrogates are not available to provide consent. "When an incapacitated older patient's treatment preferences are unknown and surrogate decision makers are unavailable, there are empirical grounds for presuming individual consent to thrombolysis for stroke," the authors write. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Using an ambulance that included a computed tomography scanner, point-of-care laboratory, telemedicine connection and a specialized prehospital stroke team resulted in decreased time to treatment for ischemic stroke, according to a study. "Our study showed that the ambulance-based thrombolysis was safe, reduced alarm-to-treatment time, and increased thrombolysis rates," the researchers write. "Further studies are needed to assess the effects on clinical outcomes." ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Although some studies have suggested that the drug lorazepam may be more effective or safer than the drug diazepam in treating a type of epileptic seizures among children, a randomized trial finds that lorazepam is not better at stopping seizures compared to diazepam. The researchers add that future trials should consider newer medications and novel interventions targeting those at highest risk for medication failure or respiratory depression. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A brain pathway that underlies the emotional behaviors critical for survival have been discovered by neuroscientists. The team has identified a chain of neural connections which links central survival circuits to the spinal cord, causing the body to freeze when experiencing fear. Understanding how these central neural pathways work is a fundamental step towards developing effective treatments for emotional disorders such as anxiety, panic attacks and phobias. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

There's a new secret to get your child to behave at the dinner table -- cut up their food! This new study found that when 6- to 10-year-old children ate food that they had to bite with their front teeth, chicken on the bone, they were rowdier than when the food had been cut into bite-sized pieces. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and affects some 400,000 people in Spain alone. However, no effective cure has yet been found. One of the reasons for this is the lack of knowledge on the cellular mechanisms which cause alterations in nerve transmissions and the loss of memory in the initial stages of the disease. Researchers have now discovered the cellular mechanism involved in memory consolidation and were able to develop a gene therapy which reverses the loss of memor ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Strenuous occupational physical activity in midlife increases the risk of mobility limitation in old age, whereas leisure-time physical activity decreases the risk. This is found in a study that followed up 5,200 public sector employees for 28 years. It states that heavy physical labor is often repetitive, wears the body and lasts for several hours a day. On the contrast, leisure-time physical activity is designed to improve fitness and provide recreation and a typical exercise session lasts for ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Hip width and risk of birth-related trauma may play a role in a woman's decision to have sex. Women who were more inclined to have one-night stands had wider hips, reveals a study into how a woman's build influences her sexual behavior. Results of the study show that the number of sexual partners a woman had is largely driven by one-night stand behavior. This, in turn, correlates with a woman's hip width and not waist-to-hip ratio. Overall, women in this study with hips wider than 14.2 inches ha ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The first study to compare and describe the occurrence and distribution patterns of basketball-related injuries treated in emergency departments and the high school athletic training setting among adolescents and teens has been conducted. The study found that in general, injuries that are more easily diagnosed and treated, such as sprains/strains, were more likely to be treated onsite by an athletic trainer while more serious injuries, such as fractures, that require more extensive diagnostic an ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Methylphenidate, also known as Ritalin, may prevent the depletion of self-control, according to research. Self-control can be difficult -- sticking with a diet or trying to focus attention on a boring textbook are hard things to do. Considerable research suggests one potential explanation for this difficulty: Exerting self-control for a long period seems to "deplete" our ability to exert self-control effectively on subsequent tasks. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Getting to the bottom of Alzheimer's disease has been a rapidly evolving pursuit with many twists, turns and controversies. In the latest crook in the research road, scientists have found a new insight into the interaction between proteins associated with the disease. The report could have important implications for developing novel treatments. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Although many organizations address poverty, they often serve similar demographics and may compete for clients and resources. Recently, researchers studied one effort to link community development organizations and concluded that this program is the hub that can improve resource access for members of underserved communities. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Fruits and vegetables are often displayed in the popular Swedish children €™s TV show Bolibompa, but there are also plenty of high-sugar foods. A new study explores how food is portrayed in children €™s TV programs, as well as the link between young children €™s TV viewing, dietary habits and weight status. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Moderate physical activity may preserve the hippocampus -- the brain region responsible for memory and spatial orientation that is attacked first in Alzheimer's disease, a study of older adults at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease shows. It is the first evidence that physical activity may protect against cognitive decline and the onset of dementia symptoms in those who carry the genetic marker for Alzheimer's. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Parents and physicians concerned about an increase in adolescents' marijuana use following the legalization of medical marijuana can breathe a sigh of relief. According to a new study that compared 20 years worth of data from states with and without medical marijuana laws, legalizing the drug did not lead to increased use among adolescents. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Some manufacturers are turning away from using triclosan as an antimicrobial ingredient in soaps, toothpastes and other products over health concerns. And now scientists are reporting new evidence that appears to support these worries. Their study found that triclosan, as well as another commercial substance called octylphenol, promoted the growth of human breast cancer cells in lab dishes and breast cancer tumors in mice. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The internal surface area of the gastro-intestinal tract has long been considered to be between 180 and 300 square meters. Scientists have used refined microscopic techniques that indicate a much smaller area. The digestive tract, which passes from the mouth through the esophagus and onwards through the intestines, has a length of about 5 meters in a normal adult, and is built up with many folds and protrusions. Previous calculations, which are reproduced in reference works and textbooks, state ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A new computer program could help doctors predict which patients might suffer potentially fatal side-effects from a key stroke treatment. The program assesses brain scans using pattern recognition software similar to that used in airport security and passport control. Currently, stroke affects over 15 million people each year worldwide. Ischemic strokes are the most common and these occur when small clots interrupt the blood supply to the brain. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The seniors who are dealing with hunger are also facing negative health and nutrition consequences, American research indicates. In a country as wealthy as the United States, it may come as a surprise that one in 12 seniors do not have access to adequate food due to lack of money or other financial resources. They are food insecure. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The human Y chromosome has, over the course of millions of years of evolution, preserved a small set of genes that has ensured not only its own survival but also the survival of men. Moreover, the vast majority of these tenacious genes appear to have little if any role in sex determination or sperm production. Taken together, these remarkable findings suggest that because these Y-linked genes are active across the body, they may actually be contributing to differences in disease susceptibility a ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A new target that could remain sensitive even when prostate cancer becomes resistant to current treatments has been discovered by researchers. Prostate cancer becomes deadly when anti-hormone treatments stop working. This new study suggests a way to block the hormones at their entrance. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Rats exposed to high-energy particles, simulating conditions astronauts would face on a long-term deep space mission, show lapses in attention and slower reaction times, even when the radiation exposure is in extremely low dose ranges, new research shows. The cognitive impairments €” which affected a large subset, but far from all, of the animals €” appear to be linked to protein changes in the brain, the scientists say. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

In response to the ongoing policy discussions on the role of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on weight and health, The Obesity Society (TOS) concludes that SSBs contribute to the United States €™ obesity epidemic, particularly among children. Based on an in-depth analysis of the current research, TOS's position statement provides several recommendations for improving health, including that children minimize their consumption of SSBs. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Genetic mutations are commonly studied because of links to diseases such as cancer; however, little is known about mutations occurring in healthy individuals. Researchers have now detected over 400 mutations in healthy blood cells of a 115-year-old woman, suggesting that lesions at these sites are largely harmless over the course of a lifetime. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A novel compound that targets an important brain receptor has a dramatic effect against a host of cocaine addiction behaviors, including relapse behavior, an animal study has found. The research provides strong evidence that this may be a novel lead compound for treating cocaine addiction, for which no effective medications exist. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A way to detect and measure cancer levels in a living cell by using tiny gold particles with tails of synthetic DNA has been developed by scientists. The process uses gold nanoparticles to target and bind to fragments of genetic material known as BRCA1 messenger RNA splice variants, which can indicate the presence and stage of breast cancer. The number of these mRNA splice variants in a cell can be determined by examining the specific signal that light produces when it interacts with the gold na ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

An important enzyme pathway that helps prevent new cells from receiving too many or too few chromosomes, a condition that has been directly linked to cancer and other diseases, has been discovered by researchers. Near the end of cell division, the enzyme Cdc14 activates Yen1, an enzyme that ensures any breaks in DNA are fully repaired before the parent cell distributes copies of the genome to daughter cells, the researchers found. This process helps safeguard against some of the most devastating ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Drug treatment and weight loss can restore lost vision, NIH-funded study shows. ... more

John J. O €™Shea, M.D. to receive the Ross Prize in Molecular Medicine. ... more

Tanzania is enlisting climate data in a new approach to curbing malaria. Reuters Health Information ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Banning chocolate milk from school cafeterias may result in reduced calorie and fat consumption, but it also leads to less milk consumption and other negative consequences, according to a pilot study. Reuters Health Information ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A law making education free and compulsory for all Indian children is failing millions of low caste, tribal and Muslim children who are dropping out of school because of rampant discrimination. Reuters Health Information ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A leading U.S. medical charity plans to partner with Riders for Health to speed up transportation of their HIV laboratory samples and deliver test results faster, a media report said. Reuters Health Information ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Older Americans who regularly spent time online were about a third less likely to suffer from depression in a new study that compared them to peers who did not use the Internet. Reuters Health Information ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

An Israeli research team tracking the incidence of head and neck tumors in interventional cardiologists, electrophysiologists, and radiologists have amassed more cases and more concern. Heartwire ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The inconvenience of taking a statin for life, the so-called "disutility " to the patients, should be factored in with the lifespan gained from treatment, which reduces with age. Heartwire ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The FDA has announced that injections given to treat neck and back pain and radiating pain in the arms and legs may result, on rare occasions, in blindness, stroke, paralysis, and death. News Alerts ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The strategy is increasingly common but hasn't had much of an evidence base; now, a large randomized trial confirms that it's safer to avoid bridging with parenteral anticoagulation. Heartwire ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The latest research to look at the potential cardiovascular dangers of cannabis use found a high rate of fatal events and suggests the rate may be rising. Heartwire ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

I #8217;ve been in the medical malpractice arena many times, and always walked away unharmed. If this system were presented in front of a fair minded and impartial jury, it would be dismantled. Sure, there are positive elements present, but they are dwarfed and suffocated by the drawbacks. The self-serving arguments supporting the current system are far outweighed by the financial and emotional costs that innocent physicians unfairly bear. Tort reform should not be controversial. Continue readin ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Reduced anxiety, other mental health benefits noted in survey ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Study looked at adults hurt in motor vehicle crashes, falls ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

But some believe the study is flawed ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Those with memory loss fared better than those who showed deficits in thinking abilities ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

I can think of at least one reason phones are being plugged into USB #8217;s #8230; Federal safety officials have issued an urgent warning about software defects in an anesthesia delivery system that can cause life-threatening failures at unexpected times, including when a cellphone or other device is plugged into one of its USB ports.The ARKON anesthesia delivery system is used in hospitals to deliver oxygen, anesthetic vapor, and nitrous oxide to patients during surgical procedures. It is man ... more
Source: GruntDoc Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Sylvant (siltuximab) to treat patients with multicentric Castleman €™s disease (MCD), a rare disorder similar to lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes). ... more
Source: Food and Drug Administration--Press Releases Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Sylvant (siltuximab) to treat patients with multicentric Castleman €™s disease (MCD), a rare disorder similar to lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes). ... more
Source: Food and Drug Administration Press Releases Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

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Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of hepatectomy with inferior vena cava or hepatic vein resection, followed by vessel reconstruction with an artificial vascular graft. Methods: From 2000 to 2011, 1,434 patients underwent several types of hepatectomy at our institution. Of these, we reviewed the cases of eight patients (0.56%) who underwent hepatectomy with inferior vena cava or hepatic vein resection and subsequent reconstruction using an expanded polytetrafluoro ... more

Teenage girls who smoke or take the oral contraceptive pill are at greater risk of heart disease than boys who smoke, according to researchers at The ... more
Source: Virtual Medical Centre Medical News Apr 23, 2014, 12:16 pm (info)

Injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death. ... more
Source: MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH@) translocations are prevalent in teens and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and may predict a poor outcome, new research suggests. Reuters Health Information ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Women who consume a lot of fat, particularly saturated fat, may be at higher risk of certain types of breast cancer, new research suggests. Reuters Health Information ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Patients are more likely to leave frustrated and without the tools they need to take charge of their own health after rushed visits. Kaiser Health News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Hospital length of stay was shortest in units in which nurses' average tenure was 1 year or more, and every additional hour of care by a staff RN was also associated with decreased stay length. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

A national survey of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain showed that the stimulation is effective only 41% of the time. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Updated results from the largest randomized prostate cancer screening trial in the world show a significant survival advantage with PSA screening for men from 50 to 74 years of age. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Residential treatment for substance use disorders produces improved functional outcomes that persist for a year after discharge. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

When you should scrub up Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Food Safety ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Don't ignore these symptomsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Traveler's Health ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Gains seen after 3 months using experimental computer program, study says Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Glaucoma ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Few crimes committed by mentally ill patients were directly linked to symptoms, researcher notes Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Mental Disorders ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Researchers found scare tactics could actually backfire, result in lower grades Source: HealthDay ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Physical well-being seems to get a boost from having an optimistic partner, study finds Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Family Issues ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Findings underscore importance of license restrictions, researchers say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Impaired Driving ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Ativan, Valium both good options for emergency treatment, experts say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Children's Health, Epilepsy, Seizures ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Study found abnormal rhythms when blood sugar dipped at night in people with type 2 disease Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Arrhythmia, Diabetes Type 2, Hypoglycemia ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Study gave Diamox, along with weight-loss plan, to patients with a different eye disease Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Eye Diseases, Glaucoma, Obesity ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Saying no to surgery, radiation tied to better outcomes in study of abnormal brain connections Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Brain Malformations, Stroke ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Study linked abnormally low or high weight to greater odds of fetal death Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Stillbirth ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Related MedlinePlus Page: Native American Health ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

And there's a bonus: heart-healthy changes will boost overall well-being, too, experts say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Erectile Dysfunction, Heart Diseases, Seniors' Health ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Source: HealthDay - Related MedlinePlus Pages: Alcohol, Kidney Diseases ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

A guest column by the American College of Physicians, exclusive to KevinMD.com. On a Thursday in April, my practice upgraded its electronic health record to the next version, the €ślatest and greatest €ť with more features, as well as compliance with meaningful uses 2 through infinity. That was the good news. The bad news was that it meant that our EHR would be unavailable for what was supposed to be several hours, but turned out to be two and a half days. Continue reading ... Your patients ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

In November of last year the American Heart Association released to recommendations on who should be taking statins (drugs like Lipitor/atorvastatin), the most common medicines we use to control cholesterol levels. High cholesterol levels are associated with higher risk of heart attacks and strokes, and taking statins, which lower cholesterol, can reduce those risks. The drugs have pretty significant side effects, though, and not everyone with high cholesterol or other cardiac risks will actu ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

€śCan you hear it? €ť she asked with a smile. The thin, pleasant lady seemed as struck by her murmur as I was. She was calm, perhaps amused by the clumsy second-year medical student listening to her heart. €śYes, yes I can, €ť I replied, barely concealing my excitement. We had just learned about the heart sounds in class. This was my first time hearing anything abnormal on a patient, though it was impossible to miss #8212; her heart was practically shouting at me. Continue reading ... Your p ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

From our friends at FlexBank: –  "The IRS announced [last October] the ability to permit employees to carryover up to $500 of an unused health FSA balance. IRS Notice 2013-71 now offers an employer the option to amend their Section 125 plan to allow up to $500 of unused funds remaining at the end of a plan year to be carried forward into the following plan year."This is significant because these plans have traditionally been "use it or lost it," and now participants may have the opportunity to r ... more
Source: InsureBlog Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

More research is needed to understand the link, experts say ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Many high school athletes assessed for sprains, strains outside the hospital ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Less than a glass a day may also help the heart in those who already have kidney disease, researchers found ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Doctors can easily test for excess protein in urine ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Artificial Retina Restores Vision Paper Money Carries Thousands of Types of Bacteria: Study /div ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Survey found Steve Jobs' death in 2011 spurred Americans to learn more about pancreatic cancer ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Studies looked at improvements in ER, specially equipped ambulance that could deliver clot-busting drug ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Is the child in pain while exercising? ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Stress can keep you awake ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 23, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

FDA scientists are working on an unprecedented project. They are studying adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are cells that can turn into a variety of cell types and tissues including those that form fat, cartilage and bone. MSC-based products have the potential to be used for cellular repair, restoration, replacement and regeneration if approved by FDA. ... more
Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates Apr 23, 2014, 12:14 pm (info)

Within 4 weeks, over 20,000 people contributed to a 52 question survey on living with diabetes in the UK. ... more
Source: Diabetes News From Medical News Today Apr 23, 2014, 12:14 pm (info)

A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:A Big Bet on Gluten-Free: 11% of households reporting purchases of gluten-free foods in 2013 (doubled in 3 yrs). 30% of the public says it would like to cut back on the amount of gluten it €™s eating. "There is a growing population of people who have somehow heard that gluten-free is healthier or think of it as fashionable, and when they remove gluten from their diet, they €™re inadvertently taking out a lot of processed foods ... more
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog Apr 23, 2014, 12:14 pm (info)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Cyramza (ramucirumab) to treat patients with advanced stomach cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, a form of cancer located in the... ... more
Source: Cancer / Oncology News From Medical News Today Apr 23, 2014, 12:14 pm (info)

A study of the gene BAALC and the smaller gene miR-3151 embedded within it finds the smaller one is the major driver of acute myeloid leukemia and not its better-known host. ... more
Source: Cancer / Oncology News From Medical News Today Apr 23, 2014, 12:14 pm (info)

The bacterium that causes whooping cough, Bordetella pertussis, has changed ndash; most likely in response to the vaccine used to prevent the disease ... more
Source: Virtual Medical Centre Medical News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 am (info)

A breakthrough treatment for hepatitis C that halves treatment time has been developed in an international clinical trial that included The University ... more
Source: Virtual Medical Centre Medical News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 am (info)

Stepping up walking practice is the only way to improve walking ability for stroke survivors, according to a new large-scale study led by University o ... more
Source: Virtual Medical Centre Medical News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 am (info)

A new study shows that domestic abuse is closely linked to postpartum mental health problems, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder ... more
Source: Virtual Medical Centre Medical News Apr 23, 2014, 6:15 am (info)

A collaborative care intervention reduced the likelihood of adolescents carrying weapons during the year after hospitalization for traumatic injuries, a randomized trial suggests. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 am (info)

From MedPage Today: Muscle Pain in the ED. Patients presenting to the emergency department with widespread muscle pain may have very low levels of vitamin D. Care of Cancer Survivors Often Falls Short. Most cancer patients enter survivorship with little direction from oncologists or primary care providers. MERS Cases Still Climbing. The number of cases of Middle East coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has topped 300, by some estimates, and the outbreak continues to evolve. Cavities in Kids? A new study of ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 23, 2014, 6:14 am (info)

A Northwestern synthetic biology team has created a new technology for modifying human cells to create programmable therapeutics that could travel the body and selectively target cancer and other... ... more

Meaningful long-term survival is possible for selected patients suffering from advanced cancer of the abdomen when treated with cytoreductive surgery with Hyperthermic IntraPeritoneal Chemotherapy... ... more

With gene expression analysis growing in importance for both basic researchers and medical practitioners, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Maryland have developed a new... ... more