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Check it out: Boosting depression-causing mechanisms in brain increases resilience, surprisingly

Potential risk of thromboembolism, pulmonary emboli, phlebitis, mechanical block of the capillaries or arterioles, activation of platelets, subsequent generation of microthrombi, and emboli. ... more
Source: MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed Apr 19, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Risk of local inflammation, and/or mechanical disruption of tissue or immune response to the particulate, and/or a delay in therapy. ... more
Source: MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed Apr 19, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

A new study has shown that free drug samples given to dermatologists can increase overall prescribing costs. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 19, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

A review has found that fibromyalgia and other 'centralized' pain states are much better understood now than previously, and effective treatment is now possible. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 19, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

A new study asks orthopedic surgeons to guess the price of the devices they implant: the amount your institution currently pays the vendor for the implant. Despite a lenient grading system, in which the researchers counted as correct any guess within 20% of the actual price, surgeons estimated costs correctly only 1 in 5 times. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 19, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

Infamous words from Hussein Obama to his political opponents. And today, he in essence said the same to the people of America. From Bunkerville - Obama proclaims National Park Week - highlights sticking it to us by creating 'monuments' Put this one down in I'm not going to let this one go down on a Friday. Obama and that sick you know what Reid are baiting us big time. O.K. you got me on this one. So two posts today. Obama sticks it to us in his Proclamation, and you know he is just getting ... more
Source: Hyscience Apr 19, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

Researchers compared college students in five nations ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 19, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

35 percent of registrants are younger than 35 years old, administration officials say ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Some people swear by the practice, but little research exists to back up health claims ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Sense of smell also altered for some patients in British study ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Tablet placed under the tongue ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

UT Southwestern has been named one of the nation s 100 Best Hospitals according to Becker s Hospital Review, a leading source of cutting-edge business and legal information for health care industry leaders. ... more
Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Older people who have apathy but not depression may have smaller brain volumes than those without apathy, according to a new study. Apathy is a lack of interest or emotion. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

A new syndrome called osteosarcopenic obesity that links the deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity has been identified by researchers. The syndrome explains how many obese individuals experience a triad of problems that place them at a higher risk for falling and breaking bones. Researchers note that the work stands to remind people to consider the damage that can be done to all parts of the body if they are overweight. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Dermatologists with access to free drug samples are more likely than those without access to samples to write prescriptions for drugs that are more expensive, according to a study. Although studies have shown that most physicians do not believe that the availability of free samples affects their behavior or recommendations for patients, the researchers found that the average retail cost of the prescriptions written by dermatologists with access to samples are about twice the cost of prescription ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Overweight U.S. service members are 41 percent less likely to transition to clinical obesity when stationed at military facilities located at high altitude, according to a new study. The quasi-experimental, retrospective study assessed the health records and migration patterns of nearly 100,000 enlisted service members in the active component of the U.S. Army and Air Force with at least two years in the services from records in the Defense Medical Surveillance System. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

For the first time, evidence that a single dose of IV-administered ketamine was associated with the rapid reduction of symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with chronic PTSD was demonstrated in a proof-of-concept, randomized, double blind crossover study. These findings could be the first step toward developing new interventions for PTSD. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Motor vehicle crashes rank as the leading cause of teen deaths and in 2008, 16% of all distraction-related fatal automobile crashes involved drivers under 20 years of age. These grim statistics, coupled with an increasing nationwide awareness of the dangers of distracted driving for all ages, prompted the publication of important research that explores the causes of distracted driving and offers practical recommendations to reduce the incidence of distracted driving among teens. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

An unexpected phenomenon in the organs that produce sperm in fruit flies has been discovered: When a certain kind of stem cell is killed off experimentally, another group of non-stem cells can come out of retirement to replace them. This study has been using the fruit fly as a model living system in which to study stem cells in their natural state. Most stem cell research is done on cells grown in the laboratory, but in real life, stem cells reside in tissues, where they are sequestered in tiny ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Analysis of 20 years worth of patient data shows that outcomes have clearly improved for patients suffering from advanced cancer of the abdomen when treated with cytoreductive surgery with Hyperthermic IntraPeritoneal Chemotherapy, or HIPEC. Cytoreductive surgery, or debulking, is removal of part of a malignant tumor which can't be completely excised and is done to enhance chemotherapy effectiveness. HIPEC is a perfusion technique in which heated chemotherapy is administered directly into the ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

The pattern of brain alterations may be similar in several different neurodegenerative diseases, which opens the door to alternative therapeutic strategies to tackle these diseases, experts say. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Fruit flies are pretty predictable when it comes to scheduling their days, with peaks of activity at dawn and dusk and rest times in between. Now, researchers have found that the clusters of brain cells responsible for each of those activity peaks -- known as the morning and evening oscillators, respectively -- don't work alone. For flies' internal clocks to follow the sun, cooperation is key. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists. The research may provide insight into the cognitive and memory disruptions seen in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's, in which gamma waves are disturbed. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Scientists studying the most common form of inherited mental disability -- a genetic disease called 'Fragile X syndrome' -- have uncovered new details about the cellular processes responsible for the condition that could lead to the development of therapies to restore some of the capabilities lost in affected individuals. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

A new classification system that may standardize how structural chromosomal rearrangements are described has been proposed by a team of researchers. Known as Next-Gen Cytogenetic Nomenclature, it is a major contribution to the classification system to potentially revolutionize how cytogeneticists worldwide translate and communicate chromosomal abnormalities. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Giving patients adrenaline after they suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital does not increase their prospects of surviving long-term, according to new research. When a person has a cardiac arrest, his or her heart stops beating. Unless the heart is restarted within minutes, the person usually dies. More than 90 per cent of people who experience a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital will die before reaching a hospital or soon after. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

A study consisting of lung cancer patients, primarily smokers between the ages of 51 to 79 years old, is shedding more light on the stigma often felt by these patients, the emotional toll it can have and how health providers can help. Previous research has shown that lung cancer carries a stigma. Because lung cancer is primarily linked to smoking behaviors, the public's opinion of the disease can often be judgmental. Today, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death globally. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Spending time online has the potential to ward off depression among retirees, particularly among those who live alone, according to research. Authors report that internet use reduced the probability of a depressed state by 33 percent among their study sample. Late-life depression affects between 5 and 10 million Americans age 50 and older. This new study shows that the Internet offers older Americans a chance to overcome the social and spatial boundaries that are believed to fuel depression. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Stem cells in bone marrow need to produce hydrogen sulfide in order to properly multiply and form bone tissue, according to a new study. Researchers demonstrated that mice's osteoporosis-like condition could be rescued by administering small molecules that release hydrogen sulfide inside the body. The results indicate that a similar treatment may have potential to help human patients. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage. A complex and devastating neurological condition, stroke is the fourth-leading cause of death and primary reason for disability in the U.S. The blood-brain barrier is severely damaged in a stroke and lets blood-borne material into the brain, causing the permanent deficits in movement and cognition ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

A review calls for improved global surveillance strategies to combat the emergence of infectious diseases such as the recent outbreak of Ebola in West Africa that has claimed the lives of 122 people in the countries of Guinea and Liberia. The deadly Ebola virus can cause mortality rates up to 90 percent of those individuals who contract the disease. No cure or vaccine exists for Ebola hemorrhagic fever and public health officials are concerned about further spread of the virus in the region. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

New research uncovers a conceptually novel approach to treating depression. Instead of dampening neuron firing found with stress-induced depression, researchers demonstrated for the first time that further activating these neurons opens a new avenue to mimic and promote natural resilience. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Mom always said you need your sleep, and it turns out, she was right. According to a new study, the lack of sleep in young fruit flies profoundly diminishes their ability to do one thing they do really, really well -- make more flies. To address whether sleep loss in young flies affects development of courtship circuits, the team investigated a group of neurons implicated in courtship. One particular subset of those neurons was smaller in sleep-deprived animals than normal flies, suggesting a po ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Fish consumption advisories for expecting mothers are ineffective in reducing infant exposure to contaminants like persistent organic pollutants. The researchers' model estimates that women who stop eating fish shortly before or during their pregnancy may only lower their child's exposure to POPs by 10 to 15 per cent. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Adolescent drivers are often distracted by technology while they are driving, but loud conversations and horseplay between passengers appear more likely to result in a dangerous incident, according to a new study. Researchers ecruited 52 North Carolina high-school age drivers to have in-vehicle cameras mounted in their cars and trucks to observe distracted driving behaviors and distracted conditions when teen drivers were behind the wheel. Young drivers were recorded in a variety of real-world d ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

A technology for engineering human cells as therapies has been developed by scientists. The the technology becomes activated only in diseased tissues. It sits on the surface of a cell and can be programmed to sense specific external factors. For example, the engineered cell could detect big, soluble protein molecules that indicate that it's next to a tumor. When the biosensor detects such a factor, it sends a signal into the engineered cell's nucleus to activate a gene expression program, such a ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

A common genetic variant that affects one in three people appears to significantly increase the risk of colorectal cancer from the consumption of processed meat, according to a new study. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Malaria-related complications remain a major cause of death for children in many parts of the world. Why some children develop these complications while others don't is still not understood. Scientists now report results of a systematic proteomics approach to the question. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

A ten-year effort by an international team has sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important pathogenic lineage of Cryptococcus neoformans, a strain called H99.These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why a fungus responsible for a million cases of pneumonia and meningitis every year is so malleable and dangerous. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Can monitoring Wikipedia hits show how many people have the flu? Researchers have developed a method of estimating levels of influenza-like illness in the American population by analyzing Internet traffic on specific flu-related Wikipedia articles. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

A combination of advanced technologies may lead to a therapy to prevent or treat respiratory syncytial virus, a potentially lethal respiratory infection affecting infants, young children and the elderly, new research suggests. Despite a wide range of anti-RSV efforts, there are no vaccines or drugs on the market to effectively prevent or treat the infection. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

The significance of a genetic variant that substantially increases the risk of a frequently fatal thoracic aortic dissection or full rupture has been confirmed by researchers. Thoracic aortic aneurysms, or bulges in the artery wall, can develop without pain or other symptoms. If they lead to a tear -- dissection -- or full rupture, the patient will often die without immediate treatment. Therefore, better identification of patients at risk for aortic aneurysm and dissection is considered essentia ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

The tropical disease malaria is caused by the Plasmodium parasite. For its survival and propagation, Plasmodium requires a protein called actin. Scientists used high-resolution structural biology methods to investigate the different versions of this protein in the parasite. Their results may in the future contribute to the development of tailor-made drugs against malaria -- a disease that causes more than half a million deaths per year. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Children who live in regions of the world where malaria is common can mount an immune response to infection with malaria parasites that may enable them to avoid repeated bouts of high fever and illness and partially control the growth of malaria parasites in their bloodstream. The findings may help researchers develop future interventions that prevent or mitigate the disease caused by the malaria parasite. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for dengue fever, West Nile virus, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. More than 40 percent of people around the world are at risk of being bitten by mosquitoes infected with the virus that causes Dengue fever and more than 100 million people are infected. This new work explains how flaviviruses produce a unique RNA molecule that leads to disease. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study. The team determined the different ways the drug SQ109 attacks the tuberculosis bacterium, how the drug can be tweaked to target other pathogens from yeast to malaria -- and how targeting multiple pathways reduces the probability of pathogens becoming resistant. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive option, according to a new study. The researchers encourage physicians and advisory boards to take all factors into account when determining how to administer the best combination of vaccines for the lowest cost. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

The negative social, physical and mental health effects of childhood bullying are still evident nearly 40 years later, according to new research. The study is the first to look at the effects of bullying beyond early adulthood. Just over a quarter of children in the study (28%) had been bullied occasionally, and 15% bullied frequently -- similar to rates in the UK today. Individuals who were bullied in childhood were more likely to have poorer physical and psychological health and cognitive func ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 18, 2014, 6:16 pm (info)

Use of undeclared sibutramine can lead to increased risk of seizures, heart attacks, arrhythmia and stroke. ... more
Source: MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed Apr 18, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

When given to prevent breast cancer in postmenopausal women, the aromatase inhibitor exemestane has little effect on quality of life, according to follow-up results of the MAP.3 trial. Reuters Health Information ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Blacks and Hispanics with ischemic heart disease didn't gain ground compared with whites, a study finds, after the 2006 health coverage reforms on which much of Obamacare is based. Heartwire ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is requiring labels of all long-acting opioids to say they should be used strictly for patients in severe pain, a response to surging overdoses and deaths each year from the widely used pain medicines. Reuters Health Information ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Men with moderate symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia treated with dutasteride plus tamsulosin hydrochloride fared better than those monitored with watchful waiting, new research shows. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The long-acting muscarinic antagonist is indicated for long-term maintenance bronchodilator treatment of airflow obstruction in adults with COPD. International Approvals ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A quality improvement intervention at Boston Children's Hospital improved adherence to PALS septic shock guidelines and possibly improved mortality. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Imagine you want health care. You go to your doctor who recommends a medication. Your doctor tells you that the medication used to be prescribed one way 14 years ago, but very rigorous, more recent studies indicate a lower dose is just as effective. And has fewer side effects. And is less expensive. You are pleased because a) your doctor is up on the latest medical therapies, and b) the least amount of medication is always best. Except if you want a medical abortion in Arizona. In that situatio ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Obesity and obesity related illness accounts for an enormous health care expenditure in the US today: approaching 150 billion dollars annually.  In an era of health care reform and cost containment, preventative medicine is essential to success.  Rather than rearranging networks, separating doctors from patients and limiting choice, our government may be more effective in reducing health care costs by focusing on slimming waistlines throughout the US. Continue reading ... Your patients are ra ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Each of these may well deserve their own post, but alas, 'tis not to be: The Obamastration's touting the latest (fake) number of sign-ups at 29 gazillion (or 8 million - I've heard it both ways). Thing is, that seems to include thousands of actual prison inmates.Kudos, Kathy! From the MVNHS© Files comes this unfortunate statistic:"Majority of foreign doctors in the UK, including from India, would fail Britain's health service exams if they were held to the same standard as their British c ... more
Source: InsureBlog Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Today's Wall Street Journal reports President Obama saying that eight million people had picked health-insurance plans through the Affordable Care Act. The point is, the repeal debate is and should be over," the president said. "The Affordable Care Act is working..." Well yeah, it's a start, but it's still at most only 20% of America s uninsured, leaving aside what this obsessively word-smithing president might mean by "picked".The insurance underwriter in me knows what Obama said is sales ... more
Source: InsureBlog Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Here's Charles Krauthammer on the man who topped the Washington Post's 2013 list as biggest liar of the year and who 60% of Americans now believe lies to them at least some, if not most, of the time.. Watch the latest video at video.insider.foxnews.com The Special Report All-Star Panel weighed in after President Obama touted the success of ObamaCare in remarks at the White House, lashing out at Republican critics. "We now know that the number of Americans who've signed up for private insuranc ... more
Source: Hyscience Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Earlier this month Hillary Clinton was the planned keynote speaker at the 17th Annual Western Healthcare Leadership Academy in San Diego - but she's cancelled her visit in the midst of planned protests from San Diego locals and military families. Now we learn that Hillary's approval is plummeting .. so could it be that Hillary's legacy of scandal, and especially Benghazi, is finally catching up with her? Via the Washington Post:A new poll shows former secretary of state Hillary Clinton's (D) ... more
Source: Hyscience Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Some people swear by the practice, but little research exists to back up health claims ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Study authors recommend not grouping these dishes together ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Efficient teamwork reduces hospital stays ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Study found those with hay fever who had high levels of stress suffered more severe symptoms ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Tablet placed under the tongue ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

Making good meal choices is harder, researcher says ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 pm (info)

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Men suffering from sexual dysfunction can be successful at reversing their problem, by focusing on lifestyle factors and not just relying on medicatio ... more
Source: Virtual Medical Centre Medical News Apr 18, 2014, 12:16 pm (info)

Contains undeclared Sildenafil, which may interact with nitrates found in some prescription drugs such as nitroglycerin and may lower blood pressure to dangerous levels. ... more
Source: MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Injected particulate matter may result in local inflammation, phlebitis, and/or low level allergic response through mechanical disruption of tissue or immune response to the particulate. ... more
Source: MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Investigators from the CDC and FDA have issued a new warning about the use of unvalidated Lyme disease tests, sparked by inquiries to the CDC about a test marketed by Advanced Laboratory Services. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Visual estimation of obstetric blood loss was significantly improved after obstetric providers were given a pocket card with images of measured units of artificial blood on commonly used materials. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

ASCO has launched the first 3 guidelines as part of a series that will cover all aspects of cancer survivorship. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

The results, presented at the European Association of Urology Congress, have 'completely radicalized and changed our paradigm,' says researcher. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

With mothers holding newborns differently, cord clamping could be delayed, researchers say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Anemia, Childbirth ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Information from MRI scans might help in obesity, diabetes research Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Obesity, Weight Control ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Kids ended up drinking less fat-free white milk, too, Oregon study finds Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Calcium, Child Nutrition, School Health ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

British researchers discover receptors on egg cells that allow sperm to attach, fertilize egg Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Infertility, Pregnancy ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Study suggests manufacturers test for all strains of P. aeruginosa to prevent infection Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Eye Infections, Eye Wear ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

European study tracked how many men came back for regular checkups over 13 years Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Men's Health, Prostate Cancer ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Study found some players still showed brain changes 6 months after season had ended Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Head Injuries, Sports Injuries ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Study finds association between self-expression, improved problem-solving skills Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Mental Health, Occupational Health ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Children need inclusion in clinical trials to ensure safety, effectiveness, researchers saySource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Children's Health, Medical Device Safety ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Study of more than 10,000 people suggests these infants may someday have more health problems Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Birth Weight, Breastfeeding ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Post-op rise in weight occurs mostly in younger, thinner children, research shows Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Body Weight, Children's Health, Tonsils and Adenoids ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

New CDC report finds certain contaminants, such as Vibrio and E. coli, on the rise Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Food Safety, Foodborne Illness, Salmonella Infections ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

'Laparoscopic power morcellation' may increase women's cancer risk, agency says Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Endoscopy, Uterine Fibroids, Women's Health ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Cryptococcus neoformans can be especially threatening to people with weak immune systems Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Fungal Infections, Genes and Gene Therapy, Meningitis ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Related MedlinePlus Page: Patient Safety ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Related MedlinePlus Page: Health Disparities ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Related MedlinePlus Page: Diabetes Complications ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Related MedlinePlus Page: Foodborne Illness ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Source: HealthDay - Related MedlinePlus Pages: College Health, Marijuana ... more
Source: MedlinePlus Health News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

It s a strange business we are in. I can freeze a couple of warts in less than a minute and send a bill to a patient s commercial insurance for much more money than for a fifteen minute visit to change their blood pressure medication. I can see a Medicaid or Medicare patient for five minutes or forty-five, and up until now, because I work for a federally qualified health center, the payment we actually receive is the same. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to res ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Apparently, the ObamaTax is all about the "glitches:""More than two dozen widows who were married to retired Madison county employees, lost their health insurance coverage earlier this year."That's Madison County, Alabama (no, not that Madison County), which had been self-insured. It's not really clear to me why that would preclude them from offering coverage of some kind, but according to county commission chairman Dale Strong, "new regulations in Obamacare would amount to an extra $25 million ... more
Source: InsureBlog Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

People hoping to buy private coverage for 2014 could be out of luck, but some windows may exist ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Treatment Costs New Focus for Medical Groups Scientists Create First Embryo Clones Using Cells From Adults Lowe's Agrees to Stricter Oversight of Lead Paint ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Study author urges caution for doctors prescribing benzodiazepines to this group ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

But consumption of harmful fats stuck at same levels as 20 years ago ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Overweight, not waist size, was tied to higher odds of developing disease in older women ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Respondents were unhappier with relationship as sleeping distance grew ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Sense of smell also altered for some patients in British study ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Offbeat rhythms of funk, hip-hip, R and B work best to get listeners on the dance floor, study finds ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

You may not be able to tell how much water is on the road ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Signs the youngster should see a doctor ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 pm (info)

Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown cause that is characterised by the formation of immune granulomas in various organs, mainly the lungs and the lymphatic system. Sarcoidosis might be the result of an exaggerated granulomatous reaction after exposure to unidentified antigens in individuals who are genetically susceptible. Diagnosis is made by symptoms, PFTs, CXR, CT, endobronchial ultrasound and PET for assessment of inflammatory activity.Recognition of unexplained persistent disabling ... more
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 pm (info)

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, with obesity apparently to... ... more

New study describes 'normal' bleeding pattern in women aged 40 to 55 years. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 6:15 am (info)

From MedPage Today: Small Practices: Down but Not Out. Emily Briggs, MD, MPH, is all too familiar with the decline in small physician practices. IV Ketamine Rapidly Effective in PTSD. Patients with moderate to severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms showed rapid and substantial relief with a single intravenous dose of ketamine in a pilot randomized trial. Missed Doses Cripple Postop DVT Prevention. Missed doses of prophylactic anticoagulation account for much of the deep vein thr ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 am (info)

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, with obesity apparently to... ... more
Source: Diabetes News From Medical News Today Apr 18, 2014, 6:14 am (info)

Researchers have found that a common gene variant - carried by 1 in 3 people - may increase risk of colorectal cancer in individuals who eat processed meat. ... more

Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. ... more

Scientists have identified two unlikely partners in a type of immune cell called a macrophage that work together in response to cancer drugs to increase inflammation in a way that may alter tumor... ... more

In a recent analysis by the RECIST Working Group published in the European Journal of Cancer, EORTC researchers had explored whether a more refined categorization of tumor response or various aspects... ... more

Case Western Reserve University dental researchers have found a less invasive way to extract single rare immune cells from the mouth to study how the mouth's natural defenses ward off infection and... ... more

Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare neoplasm exhibiting a propensity for aggressive clinical behavior. Effective treatment modality is surgical resection with wide margins, but its rate of recurrence and metastasis is still high. Early detection and complete excision of the tumor is necessary. A MFH of the occipital developed in a 51-year-old woman eight years after surgery and radiation for medulloblastoma of the cerebellar vermis. The secondary neoplasm arose at the site of tumor re ... more

Background: Because of its minimally invasive and highly accurate nature, the use of Mammotome, a vacuum-assisted breast biopsy device has proven beneficial to the treatment of benign breast lesions. Taking advantage of endoscopic and Mammotome techniques together, we utilized the Mammotome device for therapeutic excision of malignant lesions in breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods: Between December 2009 and January 2010, two patients with early breast cancer received Mammotome-assisted endo ... more

'Laparoscopic power morcellation' may increase women's cancer risk, agency says ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 18, 2014, 12:15 am (info)

Once-daily Ragwitek, the third sublingual allergy immunotherapy approved this year, is started 12 weeks before the start of ragweed pollen season and continued throughout the season. FDA Approvals ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

Unexpected cases of thrombotic microangiopathy have emerged in patients with MS taking a relatively new formulation of interferon beta in one report, but cases have been reported with all brands. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

Low birth weight, as well as maternal obesity, has been linked to the development of chronic kidney disease in children. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

From 2003 to 2011, average salt intake in England declined 15%, with a corresponding 42% reduction in stroke mortality and 40% reduction in IHD mortality. Heartwire ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

The nation's annual report card on food safety suggests more can be done to protect Americans from Salmonella and other foodborne infections, federal health officials say. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

A new study from the Coma Science Group suggests functional PET can detect signs of consciousness that are 'unexpected' on the basis of bedside testing results. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

European authorities said vials of drugs containing pemetrexed, infliximab, and trastuzumab have been stolen and possibly tampered with. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

The FDA has changed the designation of this agent from accelerated approval to full approval for the treatment of CLL. FDA Approvals ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

I heard this on the radio recently: Mom takes her new baby to the emergency department on a weekend because she thinks her daughter might have a urinary tract infection. She #8217;s right, but regulations say the baby has to stay in the hospital for two days to ensure the infection clears. Afterwards, the mom is surprised by and concerned about a $7,000 hospital bill for the baby #8217;s care. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputat ... more
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

'Laparoscopic power morcellation' may increase women's cancer risk, agency says ... more
Source: healthfinder.gov Daily News Apr 18, 2014, 12:14 am (info)

Study found some players still showed brain changes 6 months after season had ended ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

European study tracked how many men came back for regular checkups over 13 years ... more
Source: WebMD Health Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Teenagers who have suffered a traumatic brain injury such as a concussion are at 'significantly greater odds' of attempting suicide, being bullied and engaging in a variety of high-risk behaviors, a new study has found. They are also more likely to become bullies themselves, to have sought counseling through a crisis help-line or to have been prescribed medication for anxiety, depression or both. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A new field called genomic epidemiology is taking advantage of the rapidly reduced costs of next-generation DNA sequencing to better inform public health officials faced with ongoing outbreaks. While the authors caution that genomics alone cannot truly replace traditional epidemiology, they show the value and potential of using their sequence data analysis tool as a companion method for public health officials to shed light on outbreaks. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Pregnant women with chronic hypertension (high blood pressure) are highly likely to suffer from adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm delivery, low birth weight and neonatal death, which highlights a need for heightened surveillance, suggests research. Chronic hypertension complicates between 1-5% of pregnancies, and the problem may be increasing because of changes in the population. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Between 20-30 percent of food-poisoning outbreaks linked to disease-causing strains of the bacterium Escherichia coli are caused by people eating contaminated vegetables. Research shows that the disease-causing E. coli O157:H7 interacts directly with plant cells allowing it to anchor to the surface of a plant, where it can multiply. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Changes in appetite, taste and smell are par for the course for people who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery during which one's stomach is made smaller and small intestines shortened. These sensory changes are not all negative, and could lead to more weight loss among patients. Their findings showed that after gastric bypass surgery, patients frequently report sensory changes. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. In a new study, a team of scientists say novel mouse studies indicate that mutant protein levels in muscle cells are fundamentally involved in SBMA, suggesting an alternative and promising new avenue of treatment. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Imagine you cannot move your eyes up, and you cannot lift your upper eyelid. You walk through life with your head tilted upward so that your eyes look straight when they are rolled down in the eye socket. Obviously, such a condition should be corrected to allow people a normal position of their head. In order to correct this condition, one would need to understand why this happens. In a new paper, researchers describe how their studies on mutated mice mimic human mutations. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The groundwork has been laid for understanding how variations in immune responses to Lyme disease can contribute to the many different outcomes of this bacterial infection seen in individual patients. "Physicians have recognized for many years that Lyme disease is not a uniform disease process and can vary in outcomes," says the senior author of the report. "Our experiments have linked such differences to specific immune pathways controlled by elements of the immune system, which in turn might h ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

By comparing hospitalization records from Massachusetts hospitals with data reported to local boards of health, researchers found a more accurate way to monitor how well communities track disease outbreaks. For this study, the team examined healthcare statistics for Massachusetts residents 65 and older who were diagnosed with three different foodborne and waterborne illnesses -- salmonella, campylobacteriosis, and giardiasis -- from January 1991 to December 2004. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Researchers have developed a new computer tool to ensure faster care and treatment for stroke patients. The CAD stroke technology is capable of detecting signs of stroke from computed tomography (CT) scans. A CT scan uses X-rays to take pictures of the brain in slices. When blood flow to the brain is blocked, an area of the brain turns softer or decreases in density due to insufficient blood flow, pointing to an ischemic stroke. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Japanese researchers have successfully developed the world's first imaging method for visualizing the behavior of nicotine-adenine dinucleotide derivative (NAD(P)H), a key coenzyme, inside cells. This feat could ultimately facilitate the diagnosis of cancer and liver dysfunction and help to elucidate the mechanisms of neurological disorders. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Eliminating chocolate milk from elementary schools decreased total milk sales by 10 percent, and increased milk waste by 29 percent, a study has shown. Additionally, the ban may have been a factor in a 7 percent decrease in Lunch Program participation. Nutritionally, after the milk substitution, students on average consumed less sugar and fewer calories, but also consumed less protein and calcium. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Autism spectrum disorder in adolescents appears to be associated with atypical connectivity in the brain involving the systems that help people infer what others are thinking and understand the meaning of others' actions and emotions. The ability to navigate and thrive in complex social systems is commonly impaired in ASD, a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting as many as 1 in 88 children. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Each year in the UK, bacterial infections cause around 6,000 cases of a severe eye condition known as microbial keratitis an inflammation and ulceration of the cornea that can lead to loss of vision. The use of contact lenses has been identified as a particular risk factor for microbial keratitis. New research shows that a bacterial strain associated with more severe infections shows enhanced resistance to a common contact lens disinfectant solution. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

At least one in 20 adults is misdiagnosed in outpatient clinics in the U.S. every year, amounting to 12 million people nationwide, and posing a 'substantial patient safety risk,' finds research. Half of these errors could be potentially harmful, say the authors, who add that their findings should prompt renewed efforts to monitor and curb the numbers of misdiagnoses. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Changing where a newborn baby is held before its umbilical cord is clamped could lead to improved uptake in hospitals of delayed cord clamping, leading to a decreased risk of iron deficiency in infancy, according to new results from a study. Delaying clamping of the umbilical cord until around two minutes after birth allows for blood to pass from the mother's placenta to the baby, and has previously been shown to reduce the risk of iron deficiency in infancy. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient has been identified by an international research team. The new superbug is part of a class of highly-resistant bacteria known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, which is a major cause of hospital and community-associated infections. The superbug has also acquired high levels of resistance to vancomycin, the most common and least expensive antibiotic used to treat severe MRSA infections worldwide. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Children with Tourette Syndrome (TS) may unconsciously train their brain to more effectively control their tics. Teenagers diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome (TS) were slower than their typically developing peers when asked to perform a task that involved them simply moving their eyes to look at targets. However, they significantly outperformed their peers when the task was more demanding and required them to choose between looking at or away from targets. In this task they were as fast as their p ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

More research is needed on HIV and schistosomiasis coinfection in children in sub-Saharan Africa, experts say. They looked at previous research into the joint burden of HIV/AIDS and schistosomiasis of children, and found that while disease-specific control interventions are continuing, potential synergies in the control efforts for the two diseases have not been investigated. The team focused on children with schistosomiasis and assessed the risk of increased HIV transmission and progression and ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A new study has found that India s shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with the most debt-ridden farmers who are clinging to tiny smallholdings less than one hectare and trying to grow cash crops , such as cotton and coffee, that are highly susceptible to global price fluctuations. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The first MRI scan to show 'brown fat' in a living adult could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity. Brown fat has become a hot topic for scientists due its ability to use energy and burn calories, helping to keep weight in check. Understanding the brown fat tissue and how it can be used to such ends is of growing interest in the search to help people suffering from obesity or at a high risk of developing diabetes. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A group of drugs commonly prescribed for insomnia, anxiety and breathing issues 'significantly increase the risk' that older people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, need to visit a doctor or emergency department for respiratory reasons, new research has found. Benzodiazepines, such as Ativan or Xanax, may actually contribute to respiratory problems, such as depressing breathing ability and pneumonia, in these patients. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

New early-warning signs of the potential loss of sight associated with diabetes have been detected by researchers. This discovery could have far-reaching implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, potentially impacting the care of over 25 million Americans. These important early-warning signs were invisible to existing diagnostic techniques, requiring new technology based on adaptive optics. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Researchers have hit on a novel method to help kidney stone sufferers ensure they receive the correct and most effective treatment possible. Kidney stones represent a major medical problem in the western and developing world. If left untreated, apart from being particularly painful, they can lead to renal failure and other complications. In many patients treated successfully, stone recurrence is also a major problem. Clearly a more effective pathological approach to diagnosis and treatment needs ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Young women treated with radiation for cervical cancer should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier than traditionally recommended, researchers are recommending for the first time. After finding a high incidence of secondary colorectal cancers among cervical cancer survivors treated with radiation, these researchers off new recommendations that the younger women in this group begin colorectal cancer screening about eight years after their initial cervical cancer diagnosis. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Some organs have the immunological equivalent of 'neighborhood police' -- specialized squads of defenders that patrol only one area, a single organ, instead of an entire city, the body, scientists have discovered. The liver, skin and uterus each has dedicated immune cells, which the researchers call tissue-resident natural killer cells. Other organs may have similar arrangements. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

An anti-malarial treatment that lost its status as the leading weapon against the deadly disease could be given a new lease of life, with new research indicating it simply needs to be administered differently. The findings could revive the use of the cheap anti-malarial drug chloroquine in treating and preventing the mosquito-bourne disease, which claims the lives of more than half a million people each year around the world. ... more
Source: ScienceDaily: Health Medicine News Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The following comments were inspired by this insightful and very well written commentary by Margarit Gur-Arie entitled "Is the Nuremberg Code Obsolete?" After reading about where the cronies at IOM and the ideologues at Hasting Institute want to take us, I have to shout "It sure as hell better not be obsolete and do you people even know anything about the events that took place in Europe (or Macon county,Alabama for that matter) in the 20th century and why we have the Code in the first place." ... more
Source: retired doc's thoughts Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Scientists have identified and confirmed the existence of brown fat in a living adult using a novel MRI technique. The findings may lead to new treatments for obesity and diabetes. ... more

Dr. Belinda Seto joined the National Eye Institute (NEI) as its deputy director on April 7, 2014. She comes to NEI from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), where she served as deputy director for 11 years, starting just three years after NIBIB was established. ... more
Source: News from NEI Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

What s the Bottom Line? How much do we know about CoQ10? We have some information from high quality studies done in people about the safety and effectiveness of CoQ10 for different conditions. What do we know about the effectiveness of CoQ10? CoQ10 supplements may benefit some patients with cardiovascular disorders, but research on other conditions is not conclusive. What do we know about the safety of CoQ10? ... more
Source: NCCAM Featured Content Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Compensatory response shields mice from depression-like behaviors NIH-funded study. ... more

If laparoscopic power morcellation is performed in women with unsuspected uterine sarcoma, there is a risk that the procedure will spread the cancerous tissue within the abdomen and pelvis. ... more
Source: MedWatch Safety Alert RSS Feed Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

However, rates of these diabetes-related complications are still higher than in the general population, and greater efforts are still needed to stop the rising prevalence of diabetes. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Prescribers should think carefully about their treatment choices, because resistance rates to the 3 most common antibiotics for urinary tract infections (UTIs) are high, according to a new study. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

For prostate cancer patients followed with active surveillance, the addition of monitoring with per lesion transrectal ultrasound could help identify patients who need intervention. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Adding pegylated interferon to nucleos(t)ide analog treatment of hepatitis B could increase the chances for discontinuation of treatment and thereby reduce costs. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The MI registry study appears to be among the first and largest to show benefits in NSTEMI and, in either ACS, an actual prehospital-ECG survival benefit. Heartwire ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

In addition to a headline grabber as a rapid treatment for major depression, the anesthetic agent ketamine shows promise as a novel and fast-acting therapy for chronic PTSD. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A Kaiser Permanente study has found that inflammatory bowel disease can increase the risk for adverse perinatal outcomes. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Findings highlighted the need for physicians to understand barriers for seeking care and promote benefits of early antiviral treatment. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

A European study has linked high protein intake, particularly red meat, to a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The FDA is discouraging the use of laparoscopic power morcellators because of the risk of spreading cancerous tissue, which could significantly worsen the patient's likelihood of long-term survival. News Alerts ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

An advisory body in Switzerland has proposed that the country end systematic breast cancer screening with mammography. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

Testosterone may have negative consequences for cognition when oxidative stress is high, although only in white men. Researchers suggest measuring homocysteine before prescribing TRT. Medscape Medical News ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)

The latest analysis on this hot topic, this one from a large, US, multicenter registry, found bleeding to be halved among bivalirudin-treated patients compared with heparin monotherapy. Heartwire ... more
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines Apr 17, 2014, 6:15 pm (info)